US Recovers remains of PBR Crew in Canada

 
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US Recovers remains of PBR Crew in Canada

Sort of an interesting story here.  I guess I never considered that we would have MIA guys outside the obvious areas (the Pacific and European theaters) but this makes sense when I think about it.

U.S. divers searching the wreckage of a U.S. Army amphibious plane that went down in the St. Lawrence River during World War II have recovered what appear to be remains of the crew that went missing nearly seven decades ago.

The plane, a PBY-5A Catalina based in Presque Isle, Maine, had completed the first leg of a routine flight and was taking off for the return trip to base when it capsized in rough weather in the eastern Gulf of Saint Lawrence on Nov. 2, 1942.

Four of the nine people on board were pulled to safety before the plane sank.

Parks Canada discovered the plane in 2009 while conducting a survey near the village of Longue-Pointe-de-Mingan in eastern Quebec.  Earlier this month, the Joint Prisoners of War/Missing in Action Accounting Command, a federal agency that works to recover members of the military who are missing in action, dispatched a 50-person team on the USS Grapple to investigate the site in the hopes of recovering the remains of the missing.

The Catalina seems to have been a quite ubiquitous aircraft, doing just about job that was needed.  Here's a good movie that talks about the plane itself.

  

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I was privileged to serve as an aircrew member in the later version the P5M, and this was a great clip about the capability of these old birds. The last one came out of service at the end of 1966. Only one remains at Pensacola Naval Air Station.

My Dad was a Civilian (BSC) attached to the RAF Ferry Command in Bermuda and he worked on the Sperry Gyroscopes and Nordin bombsights for aircraft destined to the UK. Darrell's Island in Bermuda was a significant anti submarine and flying boat base. Canada actually made the Canso version of the PBY.

I don't understand why these planes aren't still flying patrol.
Helicopters can't fly as long, carry as much or as far or at equal cost per hour.
With updated more powerful, more efficient engines, there has to still be use for them in coastal patrol .

Currently we [US] have little need for forward operating fixed installations, like most of our [US] strength is devoted to mobility and this means a strong operating deterence from the sea using exsisting platforms [CG; DDG; FF; CVN; and aviation assets]. Our [US] current forces operate from various remote platforms capable of sustained on-point operations. Although, in a covert or even in the extreame all out global conflict simular to WWII arena, these tatics will re-emerge in the form of drones, electronic, and other organic type equipment. Crew served systems preform with great effectiveness in optimal conditions. Unfortunately, when conditions are diminished or duration is increased the need for remote operations take to flight. Human intervention is needed when contact first hand is required. Great point, your comment has purpose, and I am wondering were the documentries of current day are viewed. It seems sucessful tactics, experience or observations have dwindled into non-exsistence. The US does not have a menicing foe/enemy as before.

Currently we [US] have little need for forward operating fixed installations, like most of our [US] strength is devoted to mobility and this means a strong operating deterence from the sea using exsisting platforms [CG; DDG; FF; CVN; and aviation assets]. Our [US] current forces operate from various remote platforms capable of sustained on-point operations. Although, in a covert or even in the extreame all out global conflict simular to WWII arena, these tatics will re-emerge in the form of drones, electronic, and other organic type equipment. Crew served systems preform with great effectiveness in optimal conditions. Unfortunately, when conditions are diminished or duration is increased the need for remote operations take to flight. Human intervention is needed when contact first hand is required. Great point, your comment has purpose, and I am wondering were the documentries of current day are viewed. It seems sucessful tactics, experience or observations have dwindled into non-exsistence. The US does not have a menicing foe/enemy as before.

My first squadron in WW2 was VP23, a PBY squadron. We flew both the PBY (sea plane) and the PBY5A (amphibious). I recall that the Naval factory made a version of the PBY called the PBN, but I have never heard of a PBR. The first letters in the designation was the type of plane and the last letter was fhe manufacturer. For instance PB is for patrol bomber and Y is for Condolidated Aircraft. The letter Y was used to designate Consolidated because the letter C was already assigned to Curtis Aircraft.

When I read PBR, the first thing I thought of was Patrol Boat, River, the next thing was beer; Pabst Blue Ribbon to be exact! So I was wrong twice :)

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News from the World of Military and Veterans Issues. Iraq and A-Stan in parenthesis reflects that the author is currently deployed to that theater.