President Obama says goodbye to troops as invisible sniper claims one

 
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President Obama says goodbye to troops as invisible sniper claims one

This post is rife with the potention to go off on tangents, and I'm begging you not to.  When we got sworn into the military we resolved to support the Constitution and those appointed over us.  Like it or not, our President is our President, whether it is Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George Bush or President Obama (and President Elect Trump.)  You can disagree with policy all you want, but being a soldier, you answer to the civilian leadership.  Either way, the President said good bye to the troops yesterday:

President Obama appeared for the last time as Commander-in-Chief to give a farewell address to the troops.

The president inspected the troops during an Armed Forces Full Honor Farewell Review at Joint Base Myer-Henderson in Arlington, Virginia.

He looked the sailors and soldiers up and down as they stood at attention in full military dress.

President Obama awarded the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service to U.S. Defense Secretary Ashton Carter.

Now, all that is standard.  But anyone who has EVER been in one of these formations, or attended a military college like I have is aware that there's always an invisible sniper there.  Some troops, the more seasoned ones, try to help (?) younger ones by advising that they lock their knees.  It's akin to sending someone out for a box of grid squares, or telling them to go to the commo shack to get some squelch for the "PRC E6."

And this occasion was no different:

I have SO been that guy.  I really hope he's okay.  I really hope he's okay.  If you've never done these, standing at attention or parade rest in wool uniforms SUCKS.  I mean sucks on a level you can't imagine.

I know the CSM of the Old Guard, and he's quite honestly the best CSM I ever met.  He was a first sergeant to MOH recipient Ryan Pitts when he was in A-Stan, and I got to know him when we attended his change of command ceremony.   We gave the Old Guard an award at the last convention, and it broke my heart not to be there to see CSM Beeson, who is standing next to the Commander in this picture:

OK, so be honest, how many have done the in formation face plant before?

Posted in the burner | 7 comments
 
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You don't suppose the Marine standing next to him gave him some sage advise like "lock your knees. It is easier" do you. Naw, no Marine would ever sandbag anyone!

Stood at parade dress November 63 for what seemed like hours in Honor of President Kennedy in a cold rain at Fort Bliss didn't faint,but did catch pneumonia.

Stood at parade dress November 63 for what seemed like hours in Honor of President Kennedy in a cold rain at Fort Bliss didn't faint,but did catch pneumonia.

I was regularly tapped to do these change of command/retirement parades. Quantico in July in full dress blues claimed many a victim. One formation was so bad (ie. retiring Colonel spoke for 2.5 hrs) that Navy Corpsmen were kneeling behind the formation to drag away the fallen. I only ever succumbed to the face plant in boot camp. That was bad enough.

Semper Fi!

There is a lot to learn in boot camp and you do so from the very best, and that is never lock your kness and that is only one thing out of many things. So a lack of commucation or not paying attention is part of this promblem.

When being inspected by the commanding officer standing directly in front of me, a fly landed on my nose and stayed there until the officer went to the next soldier.

Luckily I never had to do this....do this in the Philippines or any hot area and many would fall over..it is bad even in the states in the dead of asummer

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News from the World of Military and Veterans Issues. Iraq and A-Stan in parenthesis reflects that the author is currently deployed to that theater.